Onboard the Aircraft

  • Working on an aircraft, there is a lot of risk for workplace injuries. One thing slightly unique about an aircraft as a workplace is that we can be hit with unexpected turbulence at any time and we need to be prepared for this by keeping the galleys tidy, being vigilant, etc
  • Invest in comfortable supportive shoes. I buy both my crew shoes and cabin shoes from Clarks
  • Eat water-dense foods during flights such as fruit and veg
  • Practice proper manual handling (bending your knees when lifting heavy items, etc)
  • Use both arms or alternate arms when closing lockers, pouring drinks, etc
  • Use lip balm and hand cream during flights as the cabin pressure dries our skin
  • Drink plenty of water during flights. It sounds obvious but I can't stress how important it is to stay hydrated!
  • Be open-minded. This is especially important considering all the different cultures that you experience on a daily basis from both crew and passengers
  • Be compassionate and empathetic towards all crew and passengers
  • Be mindful of your eating when you’re at work. Listen to your body and eat when you need to, but know difference between eating because you are genuinely hungry and mindlessly snacking for entertainment. I try to limit eating sweet stuff onboard and stick to crew meals, salad and fruit
  • Make sure you’re patrolling the cabin, collecting trash and checking toilets during the flight. We do it anyway as part of our job, but it’s also great exercise to stretch and help us feel more alert (even more important on those night flights)
  • When you’re in your crew rest bunk, spend a few minutes before and/or after your sleep doing some gentle stretching
  • Be welcoming to everyone of all cultures and be kind to everyone you interact with
  • Be aware and accommodating to passengers who have additional needs. These needs can be anything from a blind passenger who needs an additional safety briefing, to a passenger with reduced mobility who needs assistance getting from their seat to the lavatory. I find that the best way to help the passenger is to approach them and say "Hello, can I offer you any assistance?"